Top 10 Easiest Houseplants You Can Grow

Grow these no-fuss houseplants to bring life and color to your home. Each is durable and low-maintenance.

1. Norfolk Island Pine


The secret to keeping Norfolk Island pine healthy is to give it ample light and humidity. In low light, the lower branches may turn brown and fall off. If the air is too dry, it becomes a prime target for spider mites, a common houseplant pest. In its native habitat, Norfolk Island pine can reach 200 feet tall, but don't worry - indoors, it seldom grows taller than 10 feet.

2. Peperomia

Peperomias are a diverse group of small houseplants with waxy and often highly textured leaves. Red-edge peperomia has a narrow band of red surrounding a wide creamy leaf margin. Other peperomias we love include ripple peperomia, watermelon peperomia, baby rubber plant, and silverleaf peperomia.

3. Chinese Evergreen

This plant has great foliage; the leaves are punctuated with shades of silver, gray, or shades of green making Chinese evergreen an attractive choice to brighten low-light areas of your home. Take a cue from shopping mall plantings and use Chinese evergreen as a ground cover around an upright, treelike houseplant.

4. Grape Ivy

'Ellen Danica', the variety of grape ivy pictured here is often called oakleaf ivy because its leaves are more deeply cut than other types of grape ivy. Regardless of the variety, grape ivy is a vine with tendrils that readily cling to a trellis or stake. It offers shiny, deep green leaves that create a very nice texture.

5. Dracaena

Don't confuse this plant with the vegetable of the same name. This beautiful houseplant offers variegated leaves and a single upright stem - so it resembles a decorative corn stalk without the ears. Plant several together in a large container for a fuller appearance.

6. Fiddleleaf Fig

Fiddleleaf fig is a beautiful tree that gets its common name comes from the violin-shape outline of its leathery, deep green leaves. It tolerates low light well, though it may lose its lower leaves in dim spots. If your fiddleleaf fig grows too tall, prune stems back to the desired height, or start a new plant by air layering elongated shoots.

7. Dieffenbachia

Several closely related species share the common name of dieffenbachia. All produce canelike stems with lush foliage variegated in green and white. Grow one by itself to for a tree appearance or several together in a single container for a shrubby look. One of the plant's common names, dumb cane, comes from the effect of the toxic sap that if eaten causes swelling and numbness in the mouth and throat.

8. Snake Plant

This carefree succulent plant tolerates neglect extremely well. If you've had no success with houseplants other than plastic ones, give snake plant a try. In addition to the tall form pictured here, shorter, bird's-nest forms are available. All types withstand low light but appreciate brighter conditions. The only problem likely to develop is root rot if you overwater the plant.

9. Philodendron

Heart-leaf philodendron is a durable foliage plant that has long been the backbone of indoor gardening. It has pretty, heart-shape leaves and adapts well to low-light spots. It is often grown with stems trailing over the edge of bookshelves or large pieces of furniture.

10. English Ivy

In many areas, English ivy is commonly grown as an outdoor ground cover. But you can also use it indoors. Grow a pot of ivy on a mantel or shelf where its stems can trail down. For a more formal effect, train the stems onto a topiary form. It's also exceptionally easy to start new plants: Simply cut off a 5-inch-long section of stem, remove the bottom leaves, and pot it up in moist soil. If you keep it moist, the cutting should root in a couple of weeks.

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